Articles | Volume 14, issue 4
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-885-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-885-2017
Research article
 | 
27 Feb 2017
Research article |  | 27 Feb 2017

Ecological response to collapse of the biological pump following the mass extinction at the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary

Johan Vellekoop, Lineke Woelders, Sanem Açikalin, Jan Smit, Bas van de Schootbrugge, Ismail Ö. Yilmaz, Henk Brinkhuis, and Robert P. Speijer

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Cited articles

Açikalin, S., Vellekoop, J., Ocakoğlu, F., Yılmaz, I. Ö., Smit, J., Altiner, S. O., Goderis, S., Vonhof, H., Speijer, R. P., Woelders, L., Fornaciari, E., and Brinkhuis, H.: Geochemical and paleontological characterization of a new K–Pg Boundary locality from the Northern branch of the Neo-Tethys: Mudurnu–Göynük Basin, NW Turkey, Cretaceous Res., 52, 251–267, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cretres.2014.07.011, 2015.
Alegret, L. and Thomas, E.: Food supply to the seafloor in the Pacific Ocean after the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary event, Mar. Micropaleontol., 73, 105–116, 2009.
Alegret, L., Molina, E., and Thomas, E.: Benthic foraminiferal turnover across the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary at Agost (southeastern Spain): paleoenvironmental inferences, Mar. Micropaleontol., 48, 251–279, 2003.
Alegret, L., Thomas, E., and Lohmann, K. C.: End-Cretaceous marine mass extinction not caused by productivity collapse, P. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 109, 728–732, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1110601109, 2012.
Alegret, L., Rodríguez-Tovar, F. J., and Uchman, A.: How bioturbation obscured the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary record, Terra Nova, 27, 225–230, https://doi.org/10.1111/ter.12151, 2015.
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Short summary
The Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary, ~ 66 Ma, is characterized by a mass extinction. We studied groups of both surface-dwelling and bottom-dwelling organisms to unravel the oceanographic consequences of these extinctions. Our integrated records indicate that a reduction of the transport of organic matter to the sea floor resulted in enhanced recycling of nutrients in the upper water column and decreased food supply at the sea floor in the first tens of thousands of years after the extinctions.
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