Articles | Volume 18, issue 19
Biogeosciences, 18, 5555–5571, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-5555-2021
Biogeosciences, 18, 5555–5571, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-5555-2021

Research article 14 Oct 2021

Research article | 14 Oct 2021

Exploring the use of compound-specific carbon isotopes as a palaeoproductivity proxy off the coast of Adélie Land, East Antarctica

Kate E. Ashley et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (04 Oct 2020) by Markus Kienast
AR by Kate Ashley on behalf of the Authors (29 Nov 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (08 Dec 2020) by Markus Kienast
RR by Anonymous Referee #4 (27 Jan 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #5 (07 Feb 2021)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (08 Feb 2021) by Markus Kienast
AR by James Bendle on behalf of the Authors (23 May 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (26 May 2021) by Markus Kienast
RR by Sarah Feakins (04 Jun 2021)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (08 Jun 2021) by Markus Kienast
AR by James Bendle on behalf of the Authors (24 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
We explore the potential for the use of carbon isotopes of algal fatty acid as a new proxy for past primary productivity in Antarctic coastal zones. Coastal polynyas are hotspots of primary productivity and are known to draw down CO2 from the atmosphere. Reconstructions of past productivity changes could provide a baseline for the role of these areas as sinks for atmospheric CO2.
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