Articles | Volume 19, issue 1
Biogeosciences, 19, 93–115, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-93-2022
Biogeosciences, 19, 93–115, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-93-2022
Research article
06 Jan 2022
Research article | 06 Jan 2022

Derivation of seawater pCO2 from net community production identifies the South Atlantic Ocean as a CO2 source

Daniel J. Ford et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-171', Jonathan Sharp, 19 Aug 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Daniel Ford, 05 Oct 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2021-171', Anonymous Referee #2, 31 Aug 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Daniel Ford, 05 Oct 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (06 Oct 2021) by Peter Landschützer
AR by Daniel Ford on behalf of the Authors (07 Oct 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (07 Oct 2021) by Peter Landschützer
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (18 Oct 2021)
RR by Jonathan Sharp (19 Oct 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (01 Nov 2021) by Peter Landschützer
AR by Daniel Ford on behalf of the Authors (09 Nov 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (15 Nov 2021) by Peter Landschützer
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Short summary
This study identifies the most accurate biological proxy for the estimation of seawater pCO2 fields, which are key to assessing the ocean carbon sink. Our analysis shows that the net community production (NCP), the balance between photosynthesis and respiration, was more accurate than chlorophyll a within a neural network scheme. The improved pCO2 estimates, based on NCP, identified the South Atlantic Ocean as a net CO2 source, compared to a CO2 sink using chlorophyll a.
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