Articles | Volume 12, issue 23
Biogeosciences, 12, 6853–6868, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-6853-2015

Special issue: Hotspots of greenhouse emissions from terrestrial ecosystems...

Biogeosciences, 12, 6853–6868, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-6853-2015

Research article 01 Dec 2015

Research article | 01 Dec 2015

Impacts of climate and reclamation on temporal variations in CH4 emissions from different wetlands in China: from 1950 to 2010

T. Li et al.

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Cited articles

An, S. Q., Li, H. B., Guan, B. H., Zhou, C. F., Wang, Z. S., Deng, Z. F., Zhi, Y. B., Liu, Y. L., Xu, C., Fang, S. B., Jiang, J. H., and Li, H. L.: China's natural wetlands: past problems, current status, and future challenges, Ambio, 36, 335–342, 2007.
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Short summary
Natural wetlands in China have experienced extensive conversion and climate warming, which makes the estimation of methane emission from wetlands highly uncertain. In this paper, we simulated an increase of 25.5% in national CH4 fluxes from 1950 to 2010, which was mainly induced by climate warming. Although climate warming has accelerated CH4 fluxes, the total amount of national CH4 emissions decreased by approximately 2.35 Tg (1.91-2.81 Tg), due to a large wetland loss of 17.0 million ha.
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