Articles | Volume 18, issue 17
Biogeosciences, 18, 4985–5010, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-4985-2021
Biogeosciences, 18, 4985–5010, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-4985-2021

Research article 13 Sep 2021

Research article | 13 Sep 2021

Slowdown of the greening trend in natural vegetation with further rise in atmospheric CO2

Alexander J. Winkler et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-37', Anonymous Referee #1, 26 Feb 2021
  • CC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-37', Oliver Dilly, 06 Apr 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2021-37', Christian Frankenberg, 19 Apr 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (12 May 2021) by Martin De Kauwe
AR by Alexander J. Winkler on behalf of the Authors (22 May 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (27 May 2021) by Martin De Kauwe
RR by Christian Frankenberg (07 Jun 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (10 Jun 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (11 Jun 2021) by Martin De Kauwe
AR by Alexander J. Winkler on behalf of the Authors (30 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (28 Jul 2021) by Martin De Kauwe
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Short summary
Satellite observations since the early 1980s show that Earth's greening trend is slowing down and that browning clusters have been emerging, especially in the last 2 decades. A collection of model simulations in conjunction with causal theory points at climatic changes as a key driver of vegetation changes in natural ecosystems. Most models underestimate the observed vegetation browning, especially in tropical rainforests, which could be due to an excessive CO2 fertilization effect in models.
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