Articles | Volume 12, issue 22
Biogeosciences, 12, 6529–6571, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-6529-2015
Biogeosciences, 12, 6529–6571, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-6529-2015

Research article 18 Nov 2015

Research article | 18 Nov 2015

Edaphic, structural and physiological contrasts across Amazon Basin forest–savanna ecotones suggest a role for potassium as a key modulator of tropical woody vegetation structure and function

J. Lloyd et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
Across tropical South America, forest soils are typically of a higher cation status than their savanna equivalents with soil exchangeable potassium a key soil nutrient differentiating these two vegetation types. Differences in soil water storage capacity are also important – interacting with both potassium availability and precipitation regimes in a relatively complex manner.
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