Articles | Volume 14, issue 24
Biogeosciences, 14, 5727–5739, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5727-2017
Biogeosciences, 14, 5727–5739, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5727-2017

Research article 20 Dec 2017

Research article | 20 Dec 2017

Low pCO2 under sea-ice melt in the Canada Basin of the western Arctic Ocean

Naohiro Kosugi et al.

Related authors

Arctic Ocean CO2 uptake: an improved multiyear estimate of the air–sea CO2 flux incorporating chlorophyll a concentrations
Sayaka Yasunaka, Eko Siswanto, Are Olsen, Mario Hoppema, Eiji Watanabe, Agneta Fransson, Melissa Chierici, Akihiko Murata, Siv K. Lauvset, Rik Wanninkhof, Taro Takahashi, Naohiro Kosugi, Abdirahman M. Omar, Steven van Heuven, and Jeremy T. Mathis
Biogeosciences, 15, 1643–1661, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-1643-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-1643-2018, 2018
Short summary

Related subject area

Biogeochemistry: Coastal Ocean
Contrasting patterns of carbon cycling and dissolved organic matter processing in two phytoplankton–bacteria communities
Samu Elovaara, Eeva Eronen-Rasimus, Eero Asmala, Tobias Tamelander, and Hermanni Kaartokallio
Biogeosciences, 18, 6589–6616, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-6589-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-6589-2021, 2021
Short summary
Biophysical controls on seasonal changes in the structure, growth, and grazing of the size-fractionated phytoplankton community in the northern South China Sea
Yuan Dong, Qian P. Li, Zhengchao Wu, Yiping Shuai, Zijia Liu, Zaiming Ge, Weiwen Zhou, and Yinchao Chen
Biogeosciences, 18, 6423–6434, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-6423-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-6423-2021, 2021
Short summary
Seasonal dispersal of fjord meltwaters as an important source of iron and manganese to coastal Antarctic phytoplankton
Kiefer O. Forsch, Lisa Hahn-Woernle, Robert M. Sherrell, Vincent J. Roccanova, Kaixuan Bu, David Burdige, Maria Vernet, and Katherine A. Barbeau
Biogeosciences, 18, 6349–6375, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-6349-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-6349-2021, 2021
Short summary
Modeling cyanobacteria life cycle dynamics and historical nitrogen fixation in the Baltic Proper
Jenny Hieronymus, Kari Eilola, Malin Olofsson, Inga Hense, H. E. Markus Meier, and Elin Almroth-Rosell
Biogeosciences, 18, 6213–6227, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-6213-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-6213-2021, 2021
Short summary
Simultaneous assessment of oxygen- and nitrate-based net community production in a temperate shelf sea from a single ocean glider
Tom Hull, Naomi Greenwood, Antony Birchill, Alexander Beaton, Matthew Palmer, and Jan Kaiser
Biogeosciences, 18, 6167–6180, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-6167-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-6167-2021, 2021
Short summary

Cited articles

Anderson, L. G., Jutterström, S., Kaltin, S., Jones, E. P., and Björk, G.: Variability in river runoff distribution in the Eurasian Basin of the Arctic Ocean, J. Geophys. Res., 109, C01016, https://doi.org/10.1029/2003JC001773, 2004.
Anderson, L. and Sarmiento, J.: Redfield ratios of remineralization determined by nutrient data analysis, Global Biogeochem. Cy., 8, 65–80, 1994.
Aoyama, M. and Hydes, D. J.: How do we improve the comparability of nutrient measurements?, in: Comparability of Nutrients in the World's Ocean, edited by: Aoyama, M., Dickson, A. G., Hydes, D. J., Murata, A., Oh, J. R., Roose, P., and Woodward, E. M. S., Mother Tank, Tsukuba, Japan, 1–10, 2010.
Bates, N. R.: Air-sea CO2 fluxes and the continental shelf pump of carbon in the Chukchi Sea adjacent to the Arctic Ocean, J. Geophys. Res., 111, C10013, https://doi.org/10.1029/2005JC003083, 2006.
Bates, N. R. and Mathis, J. T.: The Arctic Ocean marine carbon cycle: evaluation of air-sea CO2 exchanges, ocean acidification impacts and potential feedbacks, Biogeosciences, 6, 2433–2459, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-6-2433-2009, 2009.
Download
Short summary
Recent variation in air–sea CO2 flux in the Arctic Ocean is focused. In order to understand the relation between sea ice retreat and CO2 chemistry, we conducted hydrographic observations in the Arctic Ocean in 2013. There were relatively high pCO2 surface layer and low pCO2 subsurface layer in the Canada Basin. The former was due to near-equilibration with the atmosphere and the latter primary production. Both were unlikely mixed by disturbance as large sea-ice melt formed strong stratification.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint