Articles | Volume 12, issue 5
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-1387-2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-1387-2015
Research article
 | 
05 Mar 2015
Research article |  | 05 Mar 2015

Rapid acidification of mode and intermediate waters in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean

L. A. Salt, S. M. A. C. van Heuven, M. E. Claus, E. M. Jones, and H. J. W. de Baar

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Cited articles

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Short summary
The increase in anthropogenic atmospheric carbon dioxide is mitigated by uptake by the world ocean, which alters the pH of the water. In the South Atlantic we find the highest rates of acidification relative to increase in anthropogenic carbon (Cant) found in Subantarctic Mode Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water. The moderate rates of increase in Cant combined with low buffering capacities, due to low salinity and alkalinity values, have caused rapid acidification in the Subantarctic Zone.
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