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We measured the sulfur gas dimethylsulfide (DMS) in marine air at a coral cay on the Great Barrier Reef. DMS is well known to be released from the world's oceans, but environmental evidence of coral reefs releasing DMS has not been clearly demonstrated. We showed the coral reef can sometimes release DMS to the air, which was seen as spikes above the DMS released from the ocean. The DMS from the reef supplements the DMS from the ocean to assist formation of clouds that influence local climate.
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Articles | Volume 14, issue 1
Biogeosciences, 14, 229–239, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-229-2017
Biogeosciences, 14, 229–239, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-229-2017

Research article 17 Jan 2017

Research article | 17 Jan 2017

Coral reef origins of atmospheric dimethylsulfide at Heron Island, southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia

Hilton B. Swan et al.

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Cited articles

Andreae, M. O. and Raemdonck, H.: Dimethyl sulfide in the surface ocean and the marine atmosphere: a global view, Science, 221, 744–747, 1983.
Ayers, G. P. and Gillett, R. W.: DMS and its oxidation products in the remote marine atmosphere: implications for climate and atmospheric chemistry, J. Sea Res., 43, 275–286, 2000.
Ayers, G. P., Ivey, J. P., and Gillett, R. W.: Coherence between seasonal cycles of dimethylsulphide, methanesulphonate and sulphate in marine air, Nature, 329, 404–406, 1991.
Ayers, G. P., Gillett, R. W., Ivey, J. P., Schäfer, B., and Gabric, A.: Short-term variability in marine atmospheric dimethylsulfide concentration, Geophys. Res. Lett., 22, 2513–2516, 1995.
Barnard, W. R., Andreae, M. O., Watkins, W. E., Bingemer, H., and Georgii, H.-W.: The flux of dimethylsulfide from the oceans to the atmosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 87, 8787–8793, 1982.
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Short summary
We measured the sulfur gas dimethylsulfide (DMS) in marine air at a coral cay on the Great Barrier Reef. DMS is well known to be released from the world's oceans, but environmental evidence of coral reefs releasing DMS has not been clearly demonstrated. We showed the coral reef can sometimes release DMS to the air, which was seen as spikes above the DMS released from the ocean. The DMS from the reef supplements the DMS from the ocean to assist formation of clouds that influence local climate.
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