Articles | Volume 16, issue 15
Biogeosciences, 16, 2949–2960, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-2949-2019
Biogeosciences, 16, 2949–2960, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-2949-2019
Ideas and perspectives
01 Aug 2019
Ideas and perspectives | 01 Aug 2019

Ideas and perspectives: Synergies from co-deployment of negative emission technologies

Thorben Amann and Jens Hartmann

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Cited articles

Ahmad, M., Rajapaksha, A. U., Lim, J. E., Zhang, M., Bolan, N., Mohan, D., Vithanage, M., Lee, S. S., and Ok, Y. S.: Biochar as a sorbent for contaminant management in soil and water: a review, Chemosphere, 99, 19–33, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2013.10.071, 2014. 
Akhtar, S. S., Li, G., Andersen, M. N., and Liu, F.: Biochar enhances yield and quality of tomato under reduced irrigation, Agricultural Water Management, 138, 37–44, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agwat.2014.02.016, 2014. 
Alloway, B. J. (Ed.): Sources of Heavy Metals and Metalloids in Soils, in: Heavy Metals in Soils: Trace Metals and Metalloids in Soils and their Bioavailability, Springer Netherlands, Dordrecht, 11–50, 2013. 
Al-Wabel, M. I., Hussain, Q., Usman, A. R. A., Ahmad, M., Abduljabbar, A., Sallam, A. S., and Ok, Y. S.: Impact of biochar properties on soil conditions and agricultural sustainability: A review, Land Degrad. Dev., 29, 2124–2161, https://doi.org/10.1002/ldr.2829, 2018. 
Anda, M., Shamshuddin, J., and Fauziah, C. I.: Increasing negative charge and nutrient contents of a highly weathered soil using basalt and rice husk to promote cocoa growth under field conditions, Soil Till. Res., 132, 1–11, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.still.2013.04.005, 2013. 
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With the recent publication of the IPCC special report on the 1.5 °C target and increased attention on carbon dioxide removal (CDR) technologies, we think it is time to advance from the current way of looking at specific strategies to a more holistic CDR perspective, since multiple "side effects" may lead to additional CO2 uptake into different carbon pools. This paper explores potential co-benefits between terrestrial CDR strategies to facilitate a maximum CO2 sequestration effect.
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