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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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BG | Articles | Volume 16, issue 20
Biogeosciences, 16, 4113–4128, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-4113-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 16, 4113–4128, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-4113-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 28 Oct 2019

Research article | 28 Oct 2019

Effects of sea animal colonization on the coupling between dynamics and activity of soil ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in maritime Antarctica

Qing Wang et al.

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Cited articles

Alves, R. J. E., Wanek, W., Zappe, A., Richter, A., Svenning, M. M., Schleper, C., and Urich, T.: Nitrification rates in Arctic soils are associated with functionally distinct populations of ammonia-oxidizing archaea, ISME J., 7, 1620–1631, https://doi.org/10.1038/ ismej.2013.35, 2013. 
Ayton, J., Aislabie, J., Barker, G. M., Saul, D., and Turner, S.: Crenarchaeota affiliated with group 1.1 b are prevalent in coastal mineral soils of the Ross Sea region of Antarctica, Environ. Microbiol., 12, 689–703, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.14622920.2009.02111.x, 2010. 
Baker, B. J., Lesniewski, R. A., and Dick, G. J.: Genome-enabled transcriptomics reveals archaeal populations that drive nitrification in a deep-sea hydrothermal plume, ISME J., 6, 2269–2279, https://doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2012.64, 2012. 
Belser, L. W. and Schmidt, E. L.: Diversity in the ammonia-oxidizing nitrifier population of a soil, Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 36, 584–588, 1978. 
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We investigated abundance, potential activity, and diversity of soil ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) in five Antarctic tundra patches, including penguin colony, seal colony, and tundra marsh. We have found (1) sea animal colonization increased AOB population size.; (2) AOB contributed to ammonia oxidation rates more than AOA in sea animal colonies; (3) community structures of AOB and AOA were closely related to soil biogeochemical processes associated with animal activities.
We investigated abundance, potential activity, and diversity of soil ammonia-oxidizing archaea...
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