Articles | Volume 12, issue 21
Biogeosciences, 12, 6429–6441, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-6429-2015
Biogeosciences, 12, 6429–6441, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-6429-2015
Reviews and syntheses
10 Nov 2015
Reviews and syntheses | 10 Nov 2015

Reviews and syntheses: Calculating the global contribution of coralline algae to total carbon burial

L. H. van der Heijden and N. A. Kamenos

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Cited articles

Adey, W. H. and Adey, P. J.: Studies on the biosystematics and ecology of the epilithic crustose Corallinaceae of the British Isles, Br. Phycol. J., 8, 343–407, https://doi.org/10.1080/00071617300650381, 1973.
Adey, W. H. and Macintyre, I. G.: Crustose coralline algae: A re-evaluation in the Geological Sciences, Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., 84, 883–904, https://doi.org/10.1130/0016-7606(1973)84< 883, 1973.
Adey, W. H. and McKibbin, D.: Studies on the maerl species Phymatolithon calcareum (Pallas) nov. comb. and Lithothamnium coralloides Crouan in the Ria de Vigo, Bot. Mar., 13, 100–106, 1970.
Adey, W. H. and Vassar, M. J.: Colonization, succession and growth rates of tropical crustose coralline algae (Rhodophyta, Cryptonemiales), Phycologia, 14, 55–69, 1975.
Agegian, C. R., Mackenzie, F. T., Tribble, J. S., and Sabine, C.: Carbonate production and flux from a mid-depth bank ecosystem, Penguin Bank, Hawaii, in: Biogeochemical cycling and fluxes between the deep euphotic zone and other oceanic realms, edited by: Agegian, C. R., 5–32, National Undersea Research Program, Rockville, Maryland, USA, 5–32, 1988.
Short summary
The ongoing increase in anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is changing the environment. Reduction of CO2 to a sustainable level is required to avoid further change. In this manuscript, the carbon storage potential of coralline algae (CA) and their deposits is accessed. We show that CA represent an as yet unquantified significant carbon repository, storing similar amounts of carbon to seagrasses and mangroves. Critically, stored carbon will likely be stable at geological timescale.
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