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Metabolic rates are sensitive to environmental conditions and can skew geochemical measurements. However, there is no way to track these rates through time. Here we investigate the controls of test porosity in planktonic foraminifera (organisms commonly used in paleoclimate studies) as a potential proxy for metabolic rate. We found that the porosity varies with body size and temperature, two key controls on metabolic rate, and that it can respond to rapid changes in ambient temperature.
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BG | Articles | Volume 15, issue 21
Biogeosciences, 15, 6607–6619, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-6607-2018
Biogeosciences, 15, 6607–6619, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-6607-2018

Research article 07 Nov 2018

Research article | 07 Nov 2018

Factors influencing test porosity in planktonic foraminifera

Janet E. Burke et al.

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Cited articles

Agutter, P. S. and Wheatley, D. N.: Metabolic scaling: consensus or controversy?, Theor. Biol. Med. Model., 1, https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-4682-1-13, 2004. 
Anagnostou, E., John, E. H., Edgar, K. M., Foster, G. L., Ridgwell, A., Inglis, G. N., Pancost, R. D., Lunt, D. J., and Pearson, P. N.: Changing atmospheric CO2 concentration was the primary driver of early Cenozoic climate, Nature, 533, 380–384, 2016. 
Aze, T., Ezard, T. H., Purvis, A., Coxall, H. K., Stewart, D. R., Wade, B. S., and Pearson, P. N.: A phylogeny of Cenozoic macroperforate planktonic foraminifera from fossil data, Biol. Rev., 86, 900–927, 2011. 
Bé, A. W.: Shell porosity of Recent planktonic foraminifera as a climatic index, Science, 161, 881–884, 1968. 
Bé, A.: Gametogenic calcification in a spinose planktonic foraminifer, Globigerinoides sacculifer (Brady), Mar. Micropaleontol., 5, 283–310, 1980. 
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Short summary
Metabolic rates are sensitive to environmental conditions and can skew geochemical measurements. However, there is no way to track these rates through time. Here we investigate the controls of test porosity in planktonic foraminifera (organisms commonly used in paleoclimate studies) as a potential proxy for metabolic rate. We found that the porosity varies with body size and temperature, two key controls on metabolic rate, and that it can respond to rapid changes in ambient temperature.
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Final-revised paper
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