Articles | Volume 19, issue 11
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2855-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2855-2022
Research article
 | 
13 Jun 2022
Research article |  | 13 Jun 2022

CO2 emissions from peat-draining rivers regulated by water pH

Alexandra Klemme, Tim Rixen, Denise Müller-Dum, Moritz Müller, Justus Notholt, and Thorsten Warneke

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Cited articles

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Borges, A. V., Darchambeau, F., Teodoru, C. R., Marwick, T. R., Tamooh, F., Geeraert, N., Omengo, F. O., Guérin, F., Lambert, T., Morana, C., Okuku, E., and Bouillon, S.: Globally significant greenhouse-gas emissions from African inland waters, Nat. Geosci., 8, 637–642, https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo2486, 2015. a, b
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Short summary
Tropical peat-draining rivers contain high amounts of carbon. Surprisingly, measured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from those rivers are comparatively moderate. We compiled data from 10 Southeast Asian rivers and found that CO2 production within these rivers is hampered by low water pH, providing a natural threshold for CO2 emissions. Furthermore, we find that enhanced carbonate input, e.g. caused by human activities, suspends this natural threshold and causes increased CO2 emissions.
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