Articles | Volume 15, issue 12
Biogeosciences, 15, 3779–3794, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-3779-2018

Special issue: Progress in quantifying ocean biogeochemistry – in honour...

Biogeosciences, 15, 3779–3794, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-3779-2018

Research article 21 Jun 2018

Research article | 21 Jun 2018

What fraction of the Pacific and Indian oceans' deep water is formed in the Southern Ocean?

James W. B. Rae and Wally Broecker

Related authors

New insights into the ~74 ka Toba eruption from sulfur isotopes of polar ice cores
Laura Crick, Andrea Burke, William Hutchison, Mika Kohno, Kathryn A. Moore, Joel Savarino, Emily A. Doyle, Sue Mahony, Sepp Kipfstuhl, James W. B. Rae, Robert C. J. Steele, R. Stephen J. Sparks, and Eric W. Wolff
Clim. Past Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-38,https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-38, 2021
Preprint under review for CP
Short summary

Related subject area

Biogeochemistry: Open Ocean
Contrasted release of insoluble elements (Fe, Al, rare earth elements, Th, Pa) after dust deposition in seawater: a tank experiment approach
Matthieu Roy-Barman, Lorna Foliot, Eric Douville, Nathalie Leblond, Fréderic Gazeau, Matthieu Bressac, Thibaut Wagener, Céline Ridame, Karine Desboeufs, and Cécile Guieu
Biogeosciences, 18, 2663–2678, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-2663-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-2663-2021, 2021
Short summary
On the barium–oxygen consumption relationship in the Mediterranean Sea: implications for mesopelagic marine snow remineralization
Stéphanie H. M. Jacquet, Dominique Lefèvre, Christian Tamburini, Marc Garel, Frédéric A. C. Le Moigne, Nagib Bhairy, and Sophie Guasco
Biogeosciences, 18, 2205–2212, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-2205-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-2205-2021, 2021
Short summary
Compound high-temperature and low-chlorophyll extremes in the ocean over the satellite period
Natacha Le Grix, Jakob Zscheischler, Charlotte Laufkötter, Cecile S. Rousseaux, and Thomas L. Frölicher
Biogeosciences, 18, 2119–2137, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-2119-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-2119-2021, 2021
Short summary
Can machine learning extract the mechanisms controlling phytoplankton growth from large-scale observations? – A proof-of-concept study
Christopher Holder and Anand Gnanadesikan
Biogeosciences, 18, 1941–1970, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-1941-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-1941-2021, 2021
Short summary
Reviews and syntheses: The biogeochemical cycle of silicon in the modern ocean
Paul J. Tréguer, Jill N. Sutton, Mark Brzezinski, Matthew A. Charette, Timothy Devries, Stephanie Dutkiewicz, Claudia Ehlert, Jon Hawkings, Aude Leynaert, Su Mei Liu, Natalia Llopis Monferrer, María López-Acosta, Manuel Maldonado, Shaily Rahman, Lihua Ran, and Olivier Rouxel
Biogeosciences, 18, 1269–1289, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-1269-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-1269-2021, 2021
Short summary

Cited articles

Abernathey, R. and Ferreira, D.: Southern Ocean isopycnal mixing and ventilation changes driven by winds, Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 10357–10365, https://doi.org/10.1002/2015GL066238, 2015. 
Anderson, L. A. and Sarmiento, J. L.: Redfield ratios of remineralization determined by nutrient data analysis, Global Biogeochem. Cy., 8, 65–80, 1994. 
Barker, S., Diz, P., Vautravers, M. J., Pike, J., Knorr, G., Hall, I. R., and Broecker, W. S.: Interhemispheric Atlantic seesaw response during the last deglaciation, Nature, 457, 1097–1102, 2009. 
Broecker, W. S., Takahashi, T., and Takahashi, T.: Sources and flow patterns of deep-ocean waters as deduced from potential temperature, salinity, and initial phosphate concentration, J. Geophys. Res.-Oceans, 90, 6925–6939, 1985a. 
Broecker, W. S., Peng, T. H., Ostlund, G., and Stuiver, M.: The distribution of bomb radiocarbon in the ocean, J. Geophys. Res.-Oceans, 90, 6953–6970, 1985b. 
Download
Short summary
The deep ocean is the major store of heat and carbon in Earth's surface environment and thus has a major impact on climate. Waters that fill the deep ocean come from the North Atlantic and the Southern Ocean, but there is debate on their relative importance. Here we reconcile previous estimates using deep sea phosphate and oxygen data. We show that although a large volume of deep water comes from the south, this does not spend enough time in the southern surface to fully exchange heat and CO2.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint