Articles | Volume 19, issue 2
Biogeosciences, 19, 477–489, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-477-2022
Biogeosciences, 19, 477–489, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-477-2022
Research article
28 Jan 2022
Research article | 28 Jan 2022

Spatially varying relevance of hydrometeorological hazards for vegetation productivity extremes

Josephin Kroll et al.

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Cited articles

Brum, M., Vadeboncoeur, M. A., Ivanov, V. Asbjornsen, H. Saleska, S., Alves, L. F., Penha, D., Dias, J. D., Aragão, L. E. O. C., Barros, F., Bittencourt, P., Pereira, L., and Oliveira, R. S.: Hydrological niche segregation defines forest structure and drought tolerance strategies in a seasonal Amazon forest, J. Ecol., 107, 318–333, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.13022, 2019. 
Budyko, M. I.: Climate and life, Academic Press, New York, p. 508, 1974. 
Denissen, J. M., Teuling, A. J., Reichstein, M., and Orth, R.: Critical soil moisture derived from satellite observations over Europe, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 125, e2019JD031672, https://doi.org/10.1029/2019JD031672, 2020. 
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Plant growth relies on having access to energy (solar radiation) and water (soil moisture). This energy and water availability is impacted by weather extremes, like heat waves and droughts, which will occur more frequently in response to climate change. In this context, we analysed global satellite data to detect in which regions extreme plant growth is controlled by energy or water. We find that extreme plant growth is associated with temperature- or soil-moisture-related extremes.
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