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Extreme weather events can but do not have to cause extreme ecosystem response. Here, we focus on hazardous ecosystem behaviour and identify coinciding weather conditions. We use a simple probabilistic risk assessment and apply it to terrestrial ecosystems, defining a hazard as negative net biome productivity. In Europe, ecosystems are vulnerable to drought in the Mediterranean and temperate region, whereas vulnerability in Scandinavia is not caused by water shortages.
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Articles | Volume 12, issue 6
Biogeosciences, 12, 1813–1831, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-1813-2015

Special issue: Climate extremes and biogeochemical cycles in the terrestrial...

Biogeosciences, 12, 1813–1831, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-1813-2015

Research article 19 Mar 2015

Research article | 19 Mar 2015

A probabilistic risk assessment for the vulnerability of the European carbon cycle to weather extremes: the ecosystem perspective

S. Rolinski et al.

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Barnaba, F., Angelini, F., Curci, G., and Gobbi, G. P.: An important fingerprint of wildfires on the European aerosol load, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 10487–10501, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-11-10487-2011, 2011.
Bedia, J., Herrera, S., Gutiérrez, J. M., Zavala, G., Urbieta, I. R., and Moreno, J. M.: Sensitivity of fire weather index to different reanalysis products in the Iberian Peninsula, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 699–708, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-12-699-2012, 2012.
Beer, C., Weber, U., Tomelleri, E., Carvalhais, N., Mahecha, M., and Reichstein, M.: Harmonized European long-term climate data for assessing the effect of changing temporal variability on land-atmosphere CO2 fluxes, J. Climate, 27, 4815–4834, 2014.
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Short summary
Extreme weather events can but do not have to cause extreme ecosystem response. Here, we focus on hazardous ecosystem behaviour and identify coinciding weather conditions. We use a simple probabilistic risk assessment and apply it to terrestrial ecosystems, defining a hazard as negative net biome productivity. In Europe, ecosystems are vulnerable to drought in the Mediterranean and temperate region, whereas vulnerability in Scandinavia is not caused by water shortages.
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