Articles | Volume 14, issue 18
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-4315-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-4315-2017
Research article
 | 
28 Sep 2017
Research article |  | 28 Sep 2017

Evaluating the Community Land Model (CLM4.5) at a coniferous forest site in northwestern United States using flux and carbon-isotope measurements

Henrique F. Duarte, Brett M. Raczka, Daniel M. Ricciuto, John C. Lin, Charles D. Koven, Peter E. Thornton, David R. Bowling, Chun-Ta Lai, Kenneth J. Bible, and James R. Ehleringer

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Cited articles

Alden, C. B., Miller, J. B., and White, J. W. C.: Can bottom-up ocean CO2 fluxes be reconciled with atmospheric 13C observations?, Tellus B, 62, 369–388, 2010.
Aranibar, J. N., Berry, J. A., Riley, W. J., Pataki, D. E., Law, B. E., and Ehleringer, J. R.: Combining meteorology, eddy fluxes, isotope measurements, and modeling to understand environmental controls of carbon isotope discrimination at the canopy scale, Global Change Biol., 12, 710–730, 2006.
Barnard, D. M. and Bauerle, W. L.: The implications of minimum stomatal conductance on modeling water flux in forest canopies, J. Geophys. Res.-Biogeo., 118, 1322–1333, 2013.
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Short summary
We evaluate the Community Land Model (CLM4.5) against observations at an old-growth coniferous forest site that is subjected to water stress each summer. We found that, after calibration, CLM was able to reasonably simulate the observed fluxes of energy and carbon, carbon stocks, carbon isotope ratios, and ecosystem response to water stress. This study demonstrates that carbon isotopes can expose structural weaknesses in CLM and provide a key constraint that may guide future model development.
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