Articles | Volume 17, issue 2
Biogeosciences, 17, 265–279, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-265-2020
Biogeosciences, 17, 265–279, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-265-2020
Research article
20 Jan 2020
Research article | 20 Jan 2020

Low sensitivity of gross primary production to elevated CO2 in a mature eucalypt woodland

Jinyan Yang et al.

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Cited articles

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This study addressed a major knowledge gap in the response of forest productivity to elevated CO2. We first quantified forest productivity of an evergreen forest under both ambient and elevated CO2, using a model constrained by in situ measurements. The simulation showed the canopy productivity response to elevated CO2 to be smaller than that at the leaf scale due to different limiting processes. This finding provides a key reference for the understanding of CO2 impacts on forest ecosystems.
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